Saturday, 23 August 2008

Making a puzzle jug #4

The spouts are applied, then holes are cut into the neck to create the puzzle of how to get the fluid out of the jug. A secret hole is pierced under the handle, which when not covered with a finger, breaks the syphon, making the riddle complete. They sure knew how to have a good time in the Middle Ages.

I went to the workshop tonight to get a photgraph of the fully constructed pot which has now been decorated and slipped, but the battery ran out on my camera so it'll have to wait.

Off to the Aeon Festival tomorrow for the weekend. I'm playing there on the main stage with the Love Daddies on Sunday afternoon at 3.30, come along if you can make it, then run off afterwards to my opening at The Imagine Gallery, - me, me, me!

Making lots of pots next week, see it all happen here - woooohooo!

Happy weekend all


7 comments:

Alan from Argyll Pottery said...

Thanks for that Douglas it's always good to see how other folk make these things.

ang said...

you da man doug, I'll be posting these up on our cbds at club in the wheel section, let you know who takes up the challenge, loving seeing some heritage it's greta stuff..ta

Becky said...

Oh wow. It'll be years before I undertake something like that but it's great to see how it's done!!! TY!

Wish I could be there for the Love Daddies gig. A couple of pix from that would be a kick too!

Alex Matisse said...

Doug, its been a while since I've had any time to look around at the other blogs. The jug is awesome. I would love to see a video of it in action if have those capabilities. One of your countrymen Mark Griffiths was down here at Marks for a week or so and helped us fire. Great guy. I'm gonna have to get over there one of these days and pay you all a visit. Don't know but it will happen sometime. Take care...

jbf said...

Thanks for the tutorial, it's quite amazing.

ang said...

hey doug i've been trying to find that link of some of your work for sale online -what was the gallery again?

doug fitch said...

Hello all. I quite enjoyed making that pot, it's the only one I've made for weeks, maybe that's why. They're not so tricky, you should give it a go. Apparently apprentices used to make them because they invole throwing and an element of hand building too - someone somewhere told me that, whether it's true or not I don't know. Alex, I know Mark Griffiths quite well, in fact I've got pots in a show with his at the moment - indeed he is a great guy. He was going to come to mine to make some slipware for the Bideford firing but he ran out of time - too busy firing kilns in the States I think!